Pittsburgh New Music Net

cutting-edge music in the ’burgh and beyond

Thu 4/23: AFRO-ASIAN MUSIC ENSEMBLE @ First Unitarian Church

Advanced Jazz and Silk Screen co-present the Pittsburgh debut of

AFRO-ASIAN MUSIC ENSEMBLE

http://discoverfredho.org/afro-asian-music-ensemble/

performing the compositions of legendary
Chinese-American jazz composer Fred Ho

http://discoverfredho.org/

Thu Apr 23 7:30 pm all ages welcome $16 adv/$20 door
First Unitarian Church, 605 Morewood Ave, Shadyside
tickets on sale at Sound Cat Records, Caliban Books,
Dave’s Music Mine, and Acoustic Music Works

Current group:

The Afro Asian Music Ensemble is the product of over three decades of Fred Ho’s revolutionary and multicultural musical and theatrical productions. Consisting of Royal Hartigan (drums), Masaru Koga (alto sax), and Ben barson (who wields Fred Ho’s own Mark VI Baritone Sax), and other notable alumni from Fred Ho’s bands including Wes Brown (bass) and David Bhindman (Tenor Sax), the ensemble represents the core of Fred’s compositional legacy. Fred wrote for this 6 piece ensemble for the majority of his career, combining groovy mixed meters bass lines with Chinese percussion, Korean operatic tuning systems, and infectious funk — all set to agitprop titles with uplifting references to the people’s struggle for liberation and dignity!

April 6, 2015 at 5:42 pm Comments (0)

Wed 4/1: MATTHEW SHIPP/MICHAEL BISIO @ First Unitarian Church

Since so many people missed this amazing avant-jazz duo last time, we are really hoping that you’ll check them out this time in the Unitarian Church’s spacious Sanctuary.

Wed April 1 7:30 pm all ages welcome
$16 advance/$20 door
First Unitarian Church, Morewood & Ellsworth, Shadyside
(conveniently located 2-3 blocks from Pitt & CMU, etc)

advance tickets: Sound Cat Records, Dave’s Music Mine,
Caliban Books, and Acoustic Music Works. no tickets are available online.

avant-garde jazz piano giant
MATTHEW SHIPP

http://www.matthewshipp.com

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matthew_Shipp

recording artist for Thirsty Ear, FMP, Aum Fidelity, Cadence, Hopscotch, 2.13.61, Hatology, Leo, No More and (most recently) Relative Pitch. Played with David S Ware, William Parker etc.

and contrabassist extraordinaire
MICHAEL BISIO

http://michaelbisio.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Bisio

recording artist for Silkheart, Cadence, Omnitone,
and many more. appears on over 60 CDs!

in a duo setting. once again, no opener needed! :)
Here are reviews of both the duo’s latest release on Relative Pitch, and the trio (with Whit Dickey) joined by saxophonist Ivo Perelman:

http://www.allaboutjazz.com/floating-ice-michael-bisio-relative-pitch-records-review-by-troy-collins.php

http://www.allaboutjazz.com/the-edge-ivo-perelman-matthew-shipp-michael-bisio-whit-dickey-leo-records-review-by-mark-corroto.php

support advanced jazz!!

March 24, 2015 at 4:01 pm Comments (0)

Hypercolor (Ligeti/Maoz/Ilgenfritz) Mon 3/10 @ Howler’s

March 10, 2015
9:00 pm

Monday March 10 9 pm $7 21+
Howler’s Coyote Cafe, 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield

from New York City on Tzadik Records
jazz-rockers HYPERCOLOR

https://hypercolorband.wordpress.com/sounds/

with special guests ((microwaves)) and Billy Castle

review from All About Jazz:
Hypercolor: Hypercolor (2015, Tzadik Records)
By DAVE WAYNE, Published: February 11, 2015

The past few months have seen a stream of truly—and in some cases mind-bogglingly—wonderful guitar-centric power trio albums. Yet, the eponymous debut of the Brooklyn-based avant-jazz-rock band Hypercolor stands out, but not for the reasons you’d think. Sure, the trio consists of musical brainiacs James Ilgenfritz and Lukas Ligeti; genre omnivores whose own work and collaborations draw as heavily from the worlds of free improvisation, contemporary classical, various ethnic musics, and art-rock as they do from jazz. How guitarist Eyal Maoz, best known as one of the most distinctive young musicians in John Zorn’s orbit, has remained an underground sort of figure is beyond me. Like his bandmates, his playing is distinctive and virtuosic, and his recordings to date have been consistently fresh and restlessly eclectic. Take, for example Hope and Destruction (Tzadik, 2009) which successfully fused traditional Yiddish melodies and modern metal with the hyperactive rhythms of 70s disco-funk.

Hypercolor is similarly eclectic. The trio eliminates the overt references to dance music, and replaces them with a punkish sort of old school jazz-rock energy. The album is rife with the sort of strutting attitude that made Tony Williams’ Lifetime (in all of its concatenations) so much fun to listen to. The end result, though, is more along the lines of Fred Frith’s great trio, Massacre, or perhaps the Nels Cline Singers.

—-

Eyal Maoz, James Ilgenfritz, and Lukas Ligeti make up Hypercolor, the NYC- based spastic jazz-rock hybrid whose ridiculous artsong craftsmanship alternately revels in complexity or brazen simplicity, favoring entropy and near-disaster over order or tidiness.

Like experimental grafting surgery gone horribly awry, Hypercolor bears limbs borrowed from 80s NYC No-Wave, and early jazz/rock, and orchestral rock textures.

Eyal Maoz is a guitarist, composer, Tzadik and Ayler Records artist and a guest member of John Zorn’s Cobra. His ensembles performed at major music festivals worldwide such as the Montreal Jazz Festival, Red Sea International Jazz Festival, NYC 2007 Winter JazzFest, the New York Jewish Music and Heritage Festival, Florida Music Harvest, The Jewzapalooza Festival in NYC and more.

Transcending the boundaries of genre, composer and percussionist Lukas Ligeti (son of composer Gyorgy Ligeti) has developed a musical style of his own that draws upon downtown NY experimentalism, contemporary classical music, jazz, electronica, and world music, particularly from Africa. Lukas creates music ranging from the through-composed to the free- improvised, often exploring non-Western elements, and has been participating in cultural exchange projects for the past 15 years. Lukas has been commissioned by Bang on a Can, Kronos Quartet, Ensemble Modern, and the American Composers Orchestra, to name a few. He frequently performs solo on the marimba lumina, a rare electronic percussion instrument. As a drummer, he co-leads several bands including Burkina Electric, the first electronica band from Burkina Faso. He has also performed and/or recorded with John Zorn, Henry Kaiser, Gary Lucas, Marilyn Crispell, John Tchicai, Jim O’Rourke, Borah Bergman, Eugene Chadbourne, and many others. He has led or co-led experimental intercultural projects in Côte d’Ivoire, Egypt, Uganda, Zimbabwe, and Lesotho, and has taught at universities in Ghana and South Africa.

Brooklyn composer, bassist, and educator James Ilgenfritz has been active in creative music since the late 90s. His work has been praised in Time Out New York, All About Jazz, and Downbeat Magazine. Recent performances include work with Pauline Oliveros, John Zorn, and Anthony Braxton. James has received grants and residencies from Issue Project Room, the American Composers Forum, and OMI Arts Center. Notable performance venues include Roulette, The Kennedy Center in Washington DC, Symphony Space, and the New Museum in SoHo. James is on Faculty at the Preparatory Center of Brooklyn College and at Brooklyn Conservatory.

February 24, 2015 at 9:52 pm Comments (0)

Flux Quartet and Mantra Percussion

February 28, 2015
8:00 pmto10:00 pm

Flux2013 copyThis February, MOTE is bringing a number of fantastic ensembles to Pittsburgh for Beyond: A Microtonal Music Festival. Night two of the festival features Flux Quartet performing Scelsi’s String Quartet #2 and other works, and Mantra Percussion performing Michael Gordon’s epic hour-long piece, Timber, for six 2 x 4 pieces of wood and light installation.

The FLUX Quartet, “one of the most fearless and important new-music ensembles around” (Joshua Kosman, San Francisco Chronicle) “who has brought a new renaissance to quartet music” (Kyle Gann, The Village Voice), has performed to rave reviews in venues from Carnegie’s Zankel Hall and Kennedy Center, to influential art institutions such as EMPAC, The Kitchen, and the Walker Art Center (with jazz icon Ornette Coleman), to international music festivals in Australia, Europe, and the Americas. It has also appeared on numerous experimental series, including Bowerbird, Roulette, and soon Music on the Edge. Their premiere recording of Morton Feldman’s monumental String Quartet No.2 was described as a “disorienting, transfixing experience that repeatedly approached and touched the sublime” (Alex Ross, The New Yorker)

Strongly influenced by the irreverent spirit and “anything-goes” philosophy of the fluxus art movement, violinist Tom Chiu founded FLUX in the late 90’s. The quartet has since cultivated an uncompromising repertoire that follows neither fashions nor trends, but rather combines yesterday’s seminal iconoclasts with tomorrow’s new voices. Alongside late 20th-century masters like Cage, Feldman, Ligeti, Nancarrow, Scelsi, and Xenakis, FLUX has premiered more than 100 works by many of today’s foremost innovators.

Mantra Percussion has been hailed by The New York Times as “finely polished…a fresh source of energy” and praised by The New Yorker and TimeOut New York for presenting one of the ten best classical performances of 2012. Committed to honoring the deep past and expanding the far-flung future of percussion music, Mantra brings to life new works for percussion by living composers, collaborates with artists from diverse genres and styles, and questions what it means to communicate by making music with and on percussive objects. They devote their collective energy toward engaging new audiences by challenging the standard concert format through evening-length events that look toward a grander artistic vision. Their mantra is to strive for each performance to be a significant moment.

Since forming as an ensemble in 2009, Mantra has been featured at festivals, venues, and universities throughout North America and in Europe including the Brooklyn Academy of Music, MATA Festival, Bang on a Can Marathon, National Public Radio,  and many others. After co-commissioning Michael Gordon’s evening-length percussion sextet Timber, Mantra gave the work’s United States premiere in October 2011 and subsequently toured the work throughout North America.

MOTE cannot wait to bring this work to Pittsburgh on Saturday February 28th, 8 p.m. at the Andy Warhol Museum. Tickets for this show, and the rest of the festival are available at http://music.pitt.edu/tickets.

 

February 10, 2015 at 9:28 pm Comments (0)

Beyond: Microtonal Music Festival

February 27, 2015
8:00 pmto10:00 pm

mak2This February, MOTE is bringing a number of fantastic ensembles to Pittsburgh for Beyond: A Microtonal Music Festival. The first of three concerts in the festival will feature guitarists Mak Grgić and Daniel Lippel performing Radelescu, cellist Theodore Mook performing Ezra Sims, and pianist/composer Michael Harrison performing his own piece Revelation.

Born in Ljubljana, Slovenia, Mak Grgić has established himself as one of the up-and-coming performers in the guitar genre.” Mak is a passionate advocate for new music and has premiered numerous new pieces. Mak’s versatile career includes solo performances and recordings as well as orchestral performances, and chamber music. He is a co-founder of DC8, Da Camera’s contemporary music ensemble, which strives to expand the definition of what a modern music ensemble can be. Mak has won many guitar competitions and recently took first prize at the Guitar Competition “Luigi Mozzani” in Italy.

Guitarist Daniel Lippel, called an “exciting soloist” (NY Times), “versatile and skillful guitarist” (Time Out New York) and a “modern guitar polymath” (Guitar Review), enjoys a diverse career that ranges through solo performances, chamber music, innovative commissioning and recording projects, and improvising contexts. Based in New York, Lippel has been the guitarist with ICE (International Contemporary Ensemble) since 2005 and Flexible Music since 2004. As a chamber musician, he has performed throughout Asia, Europe, South America, and the U.S. He has performed as a guest with the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, New York New Music Ensemble, and Either/Or Ensemble, among others.

American cellist Theodore Mook is a versatile performer, comfortable in avante-garde, classical, historical, and commercial styles. He has been a particularly active proponent of new music since 1980. Mr. Mook has played new music at the Library of Congress, the American Academy in Rome, the venerable Monday Evening Concerts at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and many others. Recent concert appearances span the globe: Perth, Brisbane, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Washington DC, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Porto, Brussels, Oldenburg, and Bremen. His extensive discography spans over 100 works, including a brand new release on New World records performing the music of Annea Lockwood.

Composer and pianist, Michael Harrison, creates music that is both forward looking and deeply rooted in different forms of traditional music. This perspective, alongside a simple and elegant gift for melody, makes him a composer that can reach audiences of many kinds. As a pianist Harrison has performed his music and received premieres at the Spoleto Festival, Palazzo delle Esposizioni in Rome, Other Minds Festival in San Francisco, in New York City at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, United Nations, Symphony Space, numerous Bang On A Can Marathons at the World Financial Center, among many others. Harrison has produced two albums of his works to critical acclaim: Times Loops and Revelation.

Music critic Tim Page wrote, “Say it plainly — Michael Harrison’s ‘Revelation: Music in Pure Intonation is probably the most brilliant and original extended composition for solo piano since the early works of Frederic Rzewski three decades ago…”

Come and see all of these amazing performers the first night of the festival: Friday, February 27th, 8 p.m. at the Andy Warhol Museum. Tickets for this show, and the rest of the festival are available at http://music.pitt.edu/tickets.

February 9, 2015 at 2:08 pm Comments (0)

Music on the Edge Chamber Orchestra

October 19, 2014
8:00 pmto10:00 pm

MOTEChamber

MOTE is excited to present the Music on the Edge Chamber Orchestra under the direction of Roger Zahab this October 19th at 8 p.m. in Bellefield Hall Auditorium. The series’ namesake orchestra is a an all-star gathering of accomplished local musicians. The program includes I give you the end of a golden string by Judith Weir (Master of the Queen’s Music), Roger Zahab’s Evening on 57th Street, Toru Takemitsu’s The Dorian Horizon, and Claude Vivier’s Zipangu.

Judith Weir, recently appointed the first female Master of the Queen’s Music, is the composer and librettist of several widely performed operas whose diverse sources include Icelandic sagas, Chinese Yuan Dynasty drama and German Romanticism interests in narrative, folklore and theatre have found expression in a broad range of musical invention. Folk music from the British Isles and beyond has influenced her music for solo instruments, and she has had strong links with performers from non-classical traditions. MOTE Chamber Orchestra director, Roger Zahab, has been a long time supporter of her music and has presented many of her pieces in Pittsburgh. In addition to his work as a musical director, Roger is a violinist who has premiered over 100 new works, and also a prolific composer whose works have been performed internationally.

Tickets are available through the University of Pittsburgh Stages Box Office, by calling 412-624-7529, or visiting music.pitt.edu/tickets. Tickets in advance: general admission is $15; students and seniors are $10. At the door: general admission is $20; non-Pitt students and seniors are $15. For Bellefield Hall Auditorium, Pitt students are admitted free with valid ID.

October 7, 2014 at 12:51 pm Comments (0)

Meridian Arts Ensemble

October 3, 2014
8:00 pmto10:00 pm

Meridian  copy

Music on the Edge is excited to open its 2014–15 season with Meridian Arts Ensemble. If you’ve been coming to MOTE concerts for a while, you may realize that this is the first brass ensemble on the series in years, quite the occasion! With nine critically-acclaimed commercial CDs, over fifty premieres, and performances on four continents and in forty-nine states under their belts, Meridian is America’s leading brass group exploring the music of today. Meridian’s exciting and ambitious musical approach has changed the face of brass chamber music; most notably by adding a percussionist to the mix, but also by pioneering new music in the brass ensemble repertoire. The ensemble is comprised of Jon Nelson (trumpet), Tim Leopold (trumpet), Daniel Grabois (horn), Benjamin Herrington (trombone), Raymond Stewart (tuba), and John Ferrari (drums).

Meridian’s October program will showcase works by Andrew Rindfleisch, including In the Zone and Four Fanfares for Two Trumpets, along with his arrangements of music by Stephen Foster (Ring de Banjo), James Thornton (When You Were Sweet Sixteen) and Walter Kollo (Warte, Warte nur ein Weilchen). A leading composer of his generation, Andrew Rindfleisch has produced dozens of works for the concert hall, including solo, chamber, vocal, choral, orchestral, and wind music. His committed interest in other forms of music-making have also led him to the composition and performance of jazz and related forms of improvisation. Rindfleisch will be attending the performance and available to answer questions about his compositions afterwards. Meridian will also perform Pitt faculty composer Amy Williams’ JB Clips, David Felder’s Canzone XXXI, and Renaissance master Giovanni Gabrieli’s Canzona per sonare no. 2.

Meridian performs on Friday, October 3, 8 p.m. at Pitt’s Bellefield Hall Auditorium. Tickets are available through the University of Pittsburgh Stages Box Office, by calling 412-624-7529, or visiting music.pitt.edu/tickets. Tickets in advance: general admission is $15; students and seniors are $10. At the door: general admission is $20; non-Pitt students and seniors are $15. For Bellefield Hall Auditorium, Pitt students are admitted free with valid ID.

For more on MOTE’s 2014-15 season, check out the season here or like us on facebook. 

September 19, 2014 at 2:59 pm Comments (0)

Garcia-De Castro performs for New Hazlett CSA

Federico Garcia-De Castro kicks of the new season of Community Supported Art with with a performance of music for two pianos at the New Hazlett. Daniel Pesca will Join Federico as the duo performs his Livre pour Deux Pianos, along with music by Simon Eastwood and Alexander Borodin. Federico will also perform his new solo piano piece, Rendering.

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August 14, 2014 at 8:35 am Comments (0)

PNME Concert 2: The Cage Variations

July 18, 2014
8:00 pm
July 19, 2014
8:00 pm

City Theatre
Tickets

The Cage Variations is a newly commissioned work from Ted Hearne constructed entirely from shards of music from contemporary American composers. Hearne melds, morphs and steals music from pre-existing works to create twelve variations on Charles Ives’ philosophical and hypnotic song “The Cage.” This colorful and prismatic program also includes each of the sampled works, in whole or in part, in its original form.

Works include:
Ted Hearne: The Cage Variations
Anna Clyne: Rapture
Morton Feldman: Patterns in a Chromatic Field
Ted Hearne: Furtive Movements
Robert Honstein: Burst (from An Index of Possibility)
Molly Joyce: Blue Swell
Amy Beth Kirsten: Pirouette on a Moon Sliver
Alex Mincek: For Petr Kotik
Philip White: Interlude
Daniel Wohl: Fluctuations (from Corps Exquis)
Scott Wollschleger: Secret Machines No. 2 and 3
Scott Wollschleger: I Is Not Me

With Timothy Jones, Baritone.

June 30, 2014 at 10:16 am Comments (0)

Pittsburgh Fringe Festival: ELCO and Shanna Simmons Dance

May 10, 2014
8:00 pm
May 11, 2014
2:00 pm

Winchester-Thurston Academy Dance Studio
Tickets

shapeimage_2

E.L.C.O. and Shanna Simmons Dance reunite “We Sing The Body Eclectic” We Sing the Body Eclectic is a new work by collaborators Shana Simmons Dance and The Eclectic Laboratory Chamber Orchestra, their fourth collaboration in the past two years. The show takes the form of a long transition from sparseness to density, calm to agitation. Using orchestral and electronic instruments, words and movement, the audience will question their own perception of time.

May 4, 2014 at 3:44 pm Comments (0)

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