Pittsburgh New Music Net

cutting-edge music in the ’burgh and beyond

Interview with Robert Dick, Part II

In the second part of my conversation with Robert he talks about his solo recital (Thursday, April 4) and his concert with Alia Musica on Saturday, April 6  when he will perform his newly revised version of his 1986 Meristem. It’s fascinating to hear him talk about the flute as a “human powered synthesizer.”

April 2, 2013 at 9:56 pm Comments (0)

Wed 4/10 @ First Unitarian: INSTANT COMPOSERS POOL ORCHESTRA (Netherlands)

The Consortium presents

Wed April 10 8 pm all ages welcome $15 adv/$20 door
First Unitarian Church, 605 Morewood Ave., Shadyside/Oakland

an evening with Dutch avant-garde jazz legends celebrating their 45th year!

INSTANT COMPOSERS POOL ORCHESTRA

http://www.icporchestra.com

tickets on sale now at Caliban Books, Sound Cat Records, Dave’s Music Mine, The Exchange Squirrel Hill, and The Exchange Downtown.

In 1958, the liner notes of a Jimmy Giuffre album coined the term “instant composition” to describe improvisation. A few years later, pianist Misha Mengelberg made the term stick. He played with drummer Han Bennink on Eric Dolphy’s “Last Date” (1964) and then
Bennink, Willem Breuker and Misha Mengelberg founded the ICP co-op in 1967. In 1974 the saxophonist left to form the Willem Breuker Kollektief, longtime flagship of Dutch improvised music. Mengelberg and Bennink founded the raggedy ICP Tentet (including German saxophonist Peter Brötzmann, and sometimes cellist Tristan Honsinger). That band matured into something very like the present-day ICP Orchestra in the 1980s, with the addition of younger players, some of whom have been there ever since. The mature ICP is a hybrid of jazz ensemble and chamber orchestra, containing new originals and old tunes (Ellington, Monk, Herbie Nichols), jazz business and funny business, full-force raveups and improv breakdowns. It’s full of surprises, unexpected turns, limber grace and strange eruptions. Nothing and no one else sounds like Amsterdam’s finest – the world’s longest-running avant-garde jazz group – and no two gigs are ever alike.

The current group includes:

Drummer Han Bennink (who has played with Sonny Rollins and Derek Bailey).

Clarinet/tenor saxophonist Ab Baars (The Ex, Steve Lacy, Roswell Rudd, Cecil Taylor).

Tenor saxophonist Tobias Delius (played with Georg Graewe).

Double bassist Ernst Glerum (John Zorn, Steve Lacy, Lee Konitz, Jamaladeen Tacuma, Don Byron, Amsterdam String Trio).

Trumpeter Thomas Heberer (Muhal Richard Abrams, Dave Douglas, Evan Parker, Enrico Rava, Elliott Sharp, Bob Moses).

Cellist Tristan Honsinger (various Cecil Taylor groups).

Michael Moore on clarinet/alto sax (Jaki Byard, Joe Maneri, Gunther Schuller, Dave Douglas).

Mary Oliver on viola (premiered works by John Cage, Morton Feldman, Brian Ferneyhough, Iannis Xenakis; played with Joelle Leandre, George Lewis).

Wolter Wierbos on trombone (Henry Threadgill, The Ex, Sonic Youth, Mingus Big ICP-F.PATELLAklBand, Gerry Hemingway).

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March 12, 2013 at 12:42 am Comments (0)

Interview with Thereminist and Composer Eric Ross

My interview with composer and thereminist Eric Ross.  He will be performing tomorrow (Thursday, September 27) at the Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ Regent Square Theater at 8 p.m.

Eric Ross Interview

September 26, 2012 at 1:01 pm Comments (0)

4/14 @ First Unitarian Church – MATTHEW SHIPP TRIO (avant-jazz giants)

April 14, 2012
8:00 pm

Saturday April 14 8 pm all ages welcome $15 advance/$20 door
First Unitarian Church, Morewood & Ellsworth, Shadyside
(short walk from the Pitt and CMU campuses, as well as from Bloomfield)

The Consortium presents an evening with free-jazz giants
MATTHEW SHIPP TRIO
Matthew Shipp – piano; Michael Bisio – bass; Whit Dickey – percussion

http://www.matthewshipp.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matthew_Shipp

Tickets on sale now at Sound Cat (née Paul’s CDs), Dave’s Music Mine,
Caliban Books, The Exchange Squirrel Hill, The Exchange Downtown,
and Garfield Artworks.

With his unique and recognizable style, pianist Matthew Shipp has worked and recorded vigorously from the late ’80s onward, creating music in which free jazz and modern classical intertwine. He first became well known in the early ’90s as the pianist in the David S. Ware Quartet, and soon began leading his own dates — most often including Ware bandmate and leading bassist William Parker — and recording a number of duets with a variety of musicians, from the legendary Roscoe Mitchell to violinist Mat Maneri, the latter another musician who began making a name for himself in the 1990s. Through his range of live and recorded performances and unswerving individual development, Shipp has come to be regarded as a prolific and respected voice in creative music into the new millennium.

“There is a moment fairly early on in pianist Matthew Shipp’s Elastic Aspects, when the solo piano that has been hypnotizing for several minutes ends and is replaced by a rather angry and anxious sounding bass, bowed fervently by trio mate Michael Bisio. It is startling, and is soon replaced by the feathery light drumming of Whit Dickey, with Shipp pecking intermittently. Bisio then rejoins his partners, sounding nimble and agile, pizzicato now, and the three roll along happily for a moment before dispersing to scream on their own, laugh on their own, and transform themselves before coming together again. What the members of this trio do remarkably well is play on their own in such a way as to be a strong unit.

Elastic Aspects is a fitting title for this suite for trio, a wonderfully flexible work which stretches and regains its form time and time again. The spotlight is shared between the three voices, going back and forth, mixing and matching, gaining momentum and retreating. Bisio’s bowing is elastic in its own right, and is a departure point at several moments—or perhaps a landing spot—but it is absolutely captivating. “Stage 10″ shows off how subtle jazz can be, how effortless three players can swing while remaining outside the traditional jazz lexicon and vocabulary. This is modern music, or at least not tied to familiar structures and changes. It is also truly moving music, full of emotion, passion, spirituality, and tenderness.

Shipp has emerged as a truly original voice in modern jazz, with a readily identifiable touch, a gift for composing and improvising, and a growing discography which is starting to reflect the tremendous talent that those who have been seeing him live for years have been anxiously awaiting. Elastic Aspects continues this trend, serving as a gorgeous suite of music performed by a trio of supremely gifted individuals.” – All About Jazz

April 4, 2012 at 1:42 pm Comments (0)

From Cage and Varèse to Tsontakis and DJ Spooky…

What a great concert last night with the Bugallo-Williams piano duo—a great wrap up for Music on the Edge’s 2011-12 season. Pittsburgh’s new music scene is really moving along!

In fact, I’m excited to announce the Hear/Now festival on April 13 and 14. It’s coproduced by the Kelly Strayhorn Theater and Alia Musica.—I’m really honored to have helped curate a pretty cool line-up for this first time.

I don’t even know where to start mentioning the highlights and keeping the list short without leaving out some of the coolest stuff! Performers include eighth blackbird’s Tim Munro, DJ Spooky, Attack Theater’s Dave Eggar, PNME’s Conor Hanik, Pittsburgh’s own Eric Moe and Michael Johnsen… there are numbers by Alia Musica, ELCO, OvreArts, and Freya Quartet, multimedia acts by Chris McGlumphy, Alisha Wormsley, and a party at the Shadow Lounge with Ben Opie and DJ Soy Sos.

And the music that is being played! We’ll get to hear Varèse (Alia Musica is playing Octandre), Cage (in Tim Munro’s own solo-flute version of the Aria for solo voice), Feldman and Worinen played by PNME’s Conor Hanik, a Philip Glass quartet performed by Freya Quartet… I get to premiere a piece by George Tsontakis with Alia Musica too

Not to mention the plenty of music by Pittsburgh composers: Mathew Rosenblum’s wonderful Circadian Rhythms, piano music by him and Eric Moe (performed by Eric himself), John Newkom’s string quartet, a premiere by John Arrigo-Nelson, the music of Luke Mayernik…

For details and discount tickets visit the Kelly Strayhorn website. The event is also announced on Facebook, so make sure to like the organizations involved!

 

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April 3, 2012 at 7:25 pm Comments (0)

Updated: 4/14 @ First Unitarian Church – MATTHEW SHIPP TRIO (avant-jazz giants)

Saturday April 14 8 pm all ages welcome $15 advance/$20 door
First Unitarian Church, Morewood & Ellsworth, Shadyside
(short walk from the Pitt and CMU campuses, as well as from Bloomfield)

The Consortium presents an evening with free-jazz giants
MATTHEW SHIPP TRIO
Matthew Shipp – piano; Michael Bisio – bass; Whit Dickey – percussion

http://www.matthewshipp.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matthew_Shipp

Tickets on sale now at Sound Cat (née Paul’s CDs), Dave’s Music Mine,
Caliban Books, The Exchange Squirrel Hill, The Exchange Downtown,
and Garfield Artworks.

With his unique and recognizable style, pianist Matthew Shipp has worked and recorded vigorously from the late ’80s onward, creating music in which free jazz and modern classical intertwine. He first became well known in the early ’90s as the pianist in the David S. Ware Quartet, and soon began leading his own dates — most often including Ware bandmate and leading bassist William Parker — and recording a number of duets with a variety of musicians, from the legendary Roscoe Mitchell to violinist Mat Maneri, the latter another musician who began making a name for himself in the 1990s. Through his range of live and recorded performances and unswerving individual development, Shipp has come to be regarded as a prolific and respected voice in creative music into the new millennium.

“There is a moment fairly early on in pianist Matthew Shipp’s Elastic Aspects, when the solo piano that has been hypnotizing for several minutes ends and is replaced by a rather angry and anxious sounding bass, bowed fervently by trio mate Michael Bisio. It is startling, and is soon replaced by the feathery light drumming of Whit Dickey, with Shipp pecking intermittently. Bisio then rejoins his partners, sounding nimble and agile, pizzicato now, and the three roll along happily for a moment before dispersing to scream on their own, laugh on their own, and transform themselves before coming together again. What the members of this trio do remarkably well is play on their own in such a way as to be a strong unit.

Elastic Aspects is a fitting title for this suite for trio, a wonderfully flexible work which stretches and regains its form time and time again. The spotlight is shared between the three voices, going back and forth, mixing and matching, gaining momentum and retreating. Bisio’s bowing is elastic in its own right, and is a departure point at several moments—or perhaps a landing spot—but it is absolutely captivating. “Stage 10″ shows off how subtle jazz can be, how effortless three players can swing while remaining outside the traditional jazz lexicon and vocabulary. This is modern music, or at least not tied to familiar structures and changes. It is also truly moving music, full of emotion, passion, spirituality, and tenderness.

Shipp has emerged as a truly original voice in modern jazz, with a readily identifiable touch, a gift for composing and improvising, and a growing discography which is starting to reflect the tremendous talent that those who have been seeing him live for years have been anxiously awaiting. Elastic Aspects continues this trend, serving as a gorgeous suite of music performed by a trio of supremely gifted individuals.” – All About Jazz

April 2, 2012 at 8:28 am Comments (0)

The Mutable Narrative

March 18, 2012
3:30 pm

Future Tenant Gallery
$12 regular / $8 students

An instrumental trio of oboe, bass and percussion, including poetry to make “spontaneous accompaniments”.

The Mutable Narrative:
Lenny Young (oboe)
Tracey Mortimore (bass)
Mike Purdue (percussion)

March 15, 2012 at 12:51 pm Comments (0)

What is this “super bowl” of which you speak?

With the Stillers safely tucked into preparations for next season and rumors swirling around whether Mike Tomlin will tap Noah Bendix-Balgley to be his next Offensive Coordinator, Pittsburghers have already forgotten that this Sunday there will be a festival of advertising with some sort of football game interspersed. And that’s just as well, since there are some fine concerts to attend this weekend. Mezzo-soprano and composer Eva Rainforth is going to give a recital of original art songs on Saturday, violinist Monique Mead’s Sunday afternoon recital will include Lutoslawski’s Subito, and Alia Musica Pittsburgh will present a program of new percussion works on Sunday evening. Don’t forget to bring the guacamole!

Here’s some more info…

 

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February 3, 2012 at 8:29 am Comments (0)

Kohanski Premieres Danielpour with Wheeling, CMU Student Composers

Elisa and Elisa in Wheeling.

Cellist extraordinaire Elisa Kohanski will be one of two soloists in Wheeling Symphony Orchestra’s premiere of Richard Danielpour’s Come Up from the Fields, Father. It’s a one night only Veteran’s Day celebration which you can find out more about here.

I’m also grateful to Michael Ceurvorst for sending me information about the CMU student composers concert this Saturday, Nov. 12 , 6 p.m. at Alumni Hall. It’s a free concert and open to the public and features all new works. Here’s more info about that event on FB. Check it out, if you can.

Let’s see, what else? Oh yeah. Tomorrow is Nigel Tufnel Day…

 

 

November 10, 2011 at 12:28 pm Comments (0)

Elisa Kohanski Premieres New Danielpour Work

November 11, 2011
8:00 pm

Capitol Theatre

Tickets

So confusing to see tiny Elisa standing next to the life-size picture of Elisa.

Elisa Kohanski, well-known to Pittsburgh new music fans as the cellist in IonSound Project, has a few other gigs keeping her busy. Like opera and ballet orchestra at the Benedum and being principal cello in Wheeling Symphony. For instance. This week part of her work at Wheeling includes premiering a work by Richard Danielpour for solo cello and baritone voice and orchestra called Come Up from the Fields, Father. Her performance is part of a Veteran’s Day celebration concert by the WSO that will include Bernstein’s Symphonic Dances from Westside Story and Copland’s Third Symphony. Cruise on down to Wheeling this Friday and give Elisa and the rest of the orchestra a listen.

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November 8, 2011 at 2:32 pm Comments (0)

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